Environment

“Logging state forests close to settlements like Mogo is totally a lost opportunity” – NSW Greens

Ian Campbell 6 August 2019
L to R Foreground: Mitch Vella, David Shoebridge Greens MLC, Derek Anderson of Coast Watchers with supporters of Friends of the Forests, Mogo in the background, surrounded by whta Mr Shoebridge says is the “waste” left behind by Forestry NSW. Photo: Gilliane Tedder.

L to R Foreground: Mitch Vella, David Shoebridge Greens MLC, Derek Anderson of Coast Watchers with supporters of Friends of the Forests, Mogo in the background, surrounded by what Mr Shoebridge says is the “waste” left behind by Forestry NSW. Photo: Gilliane Tedder.

Ongoing logging in the Mogo State Forest, south of Batemans Bay is being monitored by the Environmental Protection Authority (EPA), amid calls to value and use local forests in new ways.

“There’s so much more to gain from keeping our forests than destroying them,” says NSW Greens MP David Shoebridge.

“Logging state forests close to settlements like Mogo is totally a lost opportunity for recreational trail building, and a town like Mogo could gain such a financial benefit from being a mountain biking centre in the same way that Scottsdale in Tasmania and Woolgoolga in northern NSW have become.

“It would be an economic boost for the area, growing businesses and jobs, but the forests have to be maintained as they are – beautiful and natural – they can’t be chopped down.”

Mr Shoebridge made the comments during a recent tour of the forestry operation hosted by conservation group, Friends of the Forest.

Conservationists have made a number of complaints to the EPA, primarily around concerns for the endangered Swift Parrot.

A spokesperson for the Environment Protection Authority told Region Media, “The EPA maintains an active compliance and enforcement program to ensure that native forest logging operations are complying with the environmental rules set by the NSW Government, the Integrated Forestry Operations Approval (IFOA).”

“The IFOAs require important food sources for the endangered swift parrot to be retained and protected in known foraging areas for the species, during logging operations by Forestry Corporation of NSW.

“The EPA has inspected the logging operation in Mogo State Forest twice since the logging operation commenced. This operation is subject to an active EPA investigation, following complaints received, and no further comment will be provided on the detail of the investigation at this time.”

NSW Greens spokesperson for the Forests, David Shoebridge MLC and supporters of Friends of the Forests, Mogo gather around a tree top approximately 60cm in diameter. Photo: Gillianne Tedder.

NSW Greens spokesperson for the Forests, David Shoebridge MLC and supporters of Friends of the Forests, Mogo gather around a tree top approximately 60cm in diameter. Photo: Gillianne Tedder.

In response, the Forestry Corporation of NSW says, “As we do before all our operations, we have spent many months developing a detailed harvest plan prepared in line with strict rules to protect threatened species and soil and water and ensure the forest regenerates well for the future.”

“Our qualified forest technicians and ecologists have conducted thorough surveys for threatened species and set aside around a quarter of this compartment in exclusion zones that will be left untouched.

“We have also set aside additional feed trees for swift parrots in line with specific rules that were developed by expert panels to protect this particular species and the entire area will be regrown to ensure it continues to provide habitat for the swift parrot and other native wildlife.”

Mogo State Forest is a regrowth forest that has been producing timber for generations and has been “regenerated several times in the past,” the Forestry spokesperson says.

“This is a selective harvesting operation that will produce a mix of high-quality products and low-quality by-products, made up of 38 percent sawlog, 39 percent pulp, and 23 percent firewood.”

Mr Shoebridge says an industry that views nature as waste is an industry that has no social license to operate.

“We know the future of forestry in NSW and Australia is a future based upon plantations,” he says.

“That’s where the jobs are. That’s how we can sustainability harvest timber, and that’s how we can protect these beautiful native forests and the animals and plants that rely on them for survival.

“Too many of our trees are being wasted, turned into pulp for disposable packaging and paper.”

The Forestry Corporation of NSW says it’s Mogo operation will conclude in September.

What's Your Opinion?

24 Responses to “Logging state forests close to settlements like Mogo is totally a lost opportunity” – NSW Greens

Gee Perera 8:48 pm 07 Aug 19

Totally agree....our native forests are worth more to us a places of recreation, habitat for native animals insects and plants, water and oxygen producers, land stabilisers, carbon absorbers and climate change mitigators...than pulp.

Sue Hill 3:55 pm 07 Aug 19

Grateful that about regional has reported what the consequences of logging will be for the majority of the Batemans Bay community. Tourists visit the south coast to experience nature in all its form and for recreation. Yes, this is such a lost opportunity for the community.

Disappointed that the interview didn’t report the consequences of logging for climate destruction and mass extinction. David Shoebridge is well versed in this. And it is a responsibility of the media to let the community become aware. It’s not opinion, it’s facts.

    Nigel Catchlove 10:09 am 10 Aug 19

    Also disappointed that the benefits of sustainably harvested timber - like that from the previously harvested, regrowth forest at Mogo were not included, particularly the long-term sequestration of atmospheric carbon in timber products as well as the benefits from substitution of steel and concrete with wood based products, and the use of pulp in production of plastic substitutes using nano-fibre cellulose. "... it is a responsibility of the media to let the community become aware. It's not opinion, it's facts (sic.)"

Paul Monger Paul Monger 7:18 pm 06 Aug 19

Wonder how many of you rely on forests for an income? Im, guessing not many

Buddy Kruger Buddy Kruger 5:17 pm 06 Aug 19

Thank you Fellas, appreciate you being there. All of us should be there.

Peter Leo Harry Peter Leo Harry 12:55 pm 06 Aug 19

Its great to see another local community take a stand against logging our precious native forests. With an ensuing climate catastrophe, we need all the forests we have.

Monty Ki Monty Ki 11:39 am 06 Aug 19

A well-considered bicycle /walking trail circuit, especially including access from Batemans Bay/Catalina/Malua Bay/Ridge Road/Dunn's Creek Road area to the Eurobodalla botanical gardens and cafe amenities, Deep Creek Dam and tying in with Mogo town accessibility and picnic/bbq facilities along the way - imagine the tourist attraction it could be? The ACT government would be all over this sort of public space planning, especially with its location. What is wrong with Eurobodalla shire council/NSW state government? Can you only see short term profit opportunities in this area??? What about long term social spaces and tourism hub creation?? And saving this special bushland in the process! 🤦🏽‍♀️🤦🏽‍♀️🤦🏽‍♀️

    Janene Collins Janene Collins 12:22 pm 06 Aug 19

    Monty Ki seen the new Eurobodalla tourism ad? All about the natural riches of the area!!

    Leisa Tague Leisa Tague 10:09 pm 09 Aug 19

    Monty Ki https://www.esc.nsw.gov.au/home/news-and-events/media-releases/media-releases/new-mogo-adventure-strategy-in-development

    Monty Ki Monty Ki 10:11 pm 09 Aug 19

    Leisa Tague I think that's for a different part of Mogo, south of Mogo, west of the Highway.

    Leisa Tague Leisa Tague 10:14 pm 09 Aug 19

    Monty Ki the area identified is near and around the dam between the gardens and connecting to Batehaven/ Malta Bay etc.

    Leisa Tague Leisa Tague 10:15 pm 09 Aug 19

    https://www.esc.nsw.gov.au/inside-council/project-and-exhibitions/major-projects-and-works/mogo-adventure-trail-hub-strategy/Mogo-Adventure-Trails-Stakeholder-Meeting-Notes-290519.pdf

    Monty Ki Monty Ki 7:11 am 10 Aug 19

    Leisa Tague well that's great news. What prompted them to log it first?

    Leisa Tague Leisa Tague 7:43 am 10 Aug 19

    Monty Ki pretty sure council had nothing to do with logging. I am just responding to your comment about council and mtbing, and how they were doing nothing. I thought you would be interested to know they were.

    Monty Ki Monty Ki 7:46 am 10 Aug 19

    I put in both council and state government into my original post because I'm not sure who is directly responsible for the logging. But surely council would have some say/sway in the matter???

Jeremy De Laroche Souvestre Jeremy De Laroche Souvestre 10:39 am 06 Aug 19

I'm going to avoid posting the long essay I just wrote and simply say that wiping out the forest near Mogo is a wasted tourism opportunity. Especially through winter when everything dies down, but it would be the perfect weather for track riding, bushwalking and exploring.

Tim 10:11 am 06 Aug 19

I know this area, it's near Batemans Bay. The suburbs around Batemans Bay are expanding every year, and not on previously cleared farmland. There's a lot of native forest being converted to housing estates. That is, native forest is being permanently destroyed and converted to suburbia but it's not drawing any grief from conservationists at all. Why not? In contrast, a logging operation in a forest that has been logged many times previously, and will be converted into a native forest, is getting flak.

At the same time, the vast majority of native forest around BBay is in national parks/conservation reserves. National Parks are severely underfunded.

Funding cuts will soon have an impact on forest management and translate into problems with plant & animal pests, fires control etc. What is the Swift Parrot population like in the surrounding national parks? Is that even being monitored?

(by the way - that dog is not on a lead. You can't do that in a Park).

Amanda Evans Amanda Evans 9:22 am 06 Aug 19

The NSW government are clearly morally corrupt!

Margaret Burson 9:10 am 06 Aug 19

I used to have a yard full of all different types of parrots for years. Now it's only white cockatoos. They destroy everything. All the mess left after the logging has to be a fire risk. It breaks my heart to see the state of the forest now.

Harriett Swift Harriett Swift 9:01 am 06 Aug 19

It's wrong whether it's close to human settlements or in a remote area like Tantawangalo.

Stephen Kambouridis Stephen Kambouridis 7:50 am 06 Aug 19

Trashing the future for some mediocre ammount of jobs and profit for a few. Dumb and dumber.

Greg Peterson Greg Peterson 7:26 am 06 Aug 19

I'm no greenie and logging should be allowed but holy smoke it's like clear felling down there, from East Lynne to Nelligen has been trashed.

Vicki 7:17 am 06 Aug 19

Should have burning off to save our homes and small towns.

Keep some forest but we don't want another Tathra.

Follow the aboriginal people, the burnt off regeneration programmes.

Especially near homes towns and villages.

Nick Jay Nick Jay 7:09 am 06 Aug 19

40% pulp should be from hemp and not native forests. You’re killing the planet while watching this destruction

Top