Property

Here’s cheers to the historic Araluen pub brimming with tourism potential

Katrina Condie12 February 2022
Locals in the Araluen Valley Hotel.

The locals cool off in the iconic Araluen Valley Hotel. Photo: Adore Residential.

The walls of the Araluen Valley Hotel hold many a tale from the booming gold rush days, but now it’s time for a new chapter to be written in the history books as the iconic property hits the market for the first time in more than a decade.

Built in 1874 as a general store, the building was converted into a hotel in 1928 after the old Araluen Hotel burnt down.

Located in a picturesque valley 26 kilometres south of Braidwood, the sprawling double brick and iron hotel sits on a 7334 square-metre parcel of land and retains much of its original charm and Australiana character with a central bar, games room, bistro, beer garden and wide verandahs.

There’s also a manager’s quarters and nine guest rooms boasting ornate high ceilings, wood-burning fireplaces, wide hallways and the original timber floorboards.

Adore Residential principal Nola Debney says the sale includes the pub, all plant and equipment and the liquor licence.

After surviving the Black Summer Bushfires and the recent COVID-19 lockdowns, Nola says the business is getting back into the swing of things with lots of accommodation bookings coming in.

“The Araluen Valley Hotel is the ‘go-to place’ for the locals, but also a sought-after destination for cyclists and motorbike groups, who enjoy riding through the bush into this pretty part of our world,” she said.

“Many happy events are held here at the hotel and, as we regain our freedom to travel, many have booked in for a weekend visit.

“It’s the perfect spot for weddings and all other celebrations and, with accommodation on offer, it is an ideal spot to book into and all your guests can stay.”

Nola says the business could continue to operate as a pub, but the popularity of the region as a tourist destination provides a great opportunity for the accommodation side to grow.

“The owners have seen a big increase in the number of bikers riding down into the valley, staying overnight and having a big breakfast before heading off again,” she said.

“It’s also a great Sunday drive destination from Canberra or the coast where people can come and have a Sunday roast for lunch and check out the wonderful scenery.”

Nola says that since hitting the market just before Christmas, there has been interest in the hotel from families seeking a country lifestyle business.

“This business is growing and there is plenty more for a new owner to add their own plans and thoughts to grow it further,” she added.

The property is on the market with a price guide of $1.2 to $1.3 million.

Araluen is known for its picturesque scenery and calm, country atmosphere, but in its heyday, the valley was one of the most famous gold mining towns in New South Wales and one of the richest goldfields in Australia.

In the 1860s and 70s, the region was home to 48 licensed hotels and had a population of more than 4000.

After the discovery of gold, bushrangers grew very interested in the valley’s treasures and, as gold was transported out of the valley to Braidwood and Majors Creek up narrow, winding roads, it became an easy target for bushrangers.

In 1865, the local Clarke Brothers, together with two other infamous bushrangers, Ben Hall and Johnny Gilbert, attempted to rob a gold escort going up the steep road towards Majors Creek. They shot one of the guards, Constable Kelly, before being forced to flee as they were outflanked by the outriders.

The town is now best known for producing a range of stone fruit including the iconic Araluen Peach, but has a varied and colourful history, much of which can be found on the walls of the pub.

To find out more information about the Araleun Valley Hotel and to arrange an inspection, contact Nola Debney at Adore Residential Batemans Bay on 0412 907 002.

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