Opinion

Death of a cyclist: Some tolerance please

Tim Gavel 15 February 2019
Blurry of Cyclists ride through lighted city.Background.

Why has the death of a cyclist prompted hatred and not awareness?

Editors note: Tim Gavel picks up on growing concerns in the Canberra cycling community following the recent death of one of their own. The tragic circumstances Tim outlines follow the death of David Brand last year west of Pambula in a road rage incident. That man pleaded guilty and received a community sentence. In court earlier this month, David’s widow Louise spoke with passion about the need for more education and a change of attitude. Her words add great weight to Tim’s argument, catch up HERE. We haven’t heard the last on this issue.

News that a cyclist had died after being hit by a truck on the Federal Highway sent a shudder through the cycling community once again. My thoughts are with the rider’s family and friends as they cope with this sudden loss of someone they loved.

The ride to Lake George and back is something we in the cycling community regard as reasonably safe even though cars, trucks and buses, at times, feel as though they are no more than centimetres away. It is a very popular cycle trip. The views are lovely, particularly around Lake George, and the road offers a good, even surface.

It is, after all, a dual carriageway with plenty of room for both cyclists and vehicles to co-exist.

There has been an outpouring of grief and sorrow among cyclists and many others in the community when the devastating news broke. I was shocked then, to discover via social media that responses to the death of the cyclist were not universally sympathetic.

A number of social media responders used this tragedy as a platform to attack the existence of cyclists on the roads.

Why does the death of a cyclist prompt such hatred towards one of the most vulnerable of road users?

Some of them are simply outright ignorant.

The assumption underpinning many social media contributors to this tragic incident is that roads have been built for one purpose: to get from one place to another, in a car, bus, motorbike or truck, in the fastest legal manner.

One social media respondent suggested cyclists should not be on the road because they don’t go the same speed as cars and present a hazard because they travel 20 kilometres under the speed limit. There was one post, which advocated for cyclists to be banned on roads unless they are travelling at 60 kilometres an hour.

There was further ignorance when another suggested that cyclists should be confined to bike paths. Another said cyclists should ride at velodromes instead of roads.

Not all cyclists do the right thing. Some don’t abide by the road rules. But does it justify the hostility displayed in these social media posts?

These posts, I have no doubt, reflect the views of a section of road users who despise the very existence of cyclists.

So instead of the death of a cyclist raising awareness of the need to look out for all road users, the anti-cycling community are using it to promote hatred towards cyclists.

Perhaps, disappointingly, it’s a reflection upon our society. Tolerance on our roadways towards all users might help us realise that getting to our destination a couple of minutes earlier doesn’t really make any difference at all.

Original Article published by Tim Gavel on The RiotACT.

What's Your Opinion?

2 Responses to Death of a cyclist: Some tolerance please

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Troy Debrincat 12:38 pm 20 Feb 19

It will only get worse. Roads need to be cycle friendly. We have the space ro build the roas with a bike lane so do it. This country is backward in moving forward

Dr Douglas Simper 1:00 pm 15 Feb 19

I have seen drivers who are impatient and pull out (over double lines) to overtake a cyclist – rather than waiting behind the bike until it is safe to pass. I am afraid that these people have low intelligence and are selfish morons. I suspect it is mostly male stupidity and agression.

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