Arts & Culture

Photo comp winners give us a ‘wild eye’ on local environment

Ian Campbell 18 January 2019
1st in Terrestrial Vertebrates and 1st Place Overall 'Snow Wombat Running' by Harrison Warne. Location: South East Forest National Park "It’s hard to believe this image was taken in the south coast region. After a large east-coast low dumped a load of snow on top of the escarpment I travelled to Mt Darrah where I captured this image." - Harrison.

First in Terrestrial Vertebrates and First Place Overall, ‘Snow Wombat Running’ by Harrison Warne. Location: South East Forest National Park. “It’s hard to believe this image was taken in the south coast region. After a large east-coast low dumped a load of snow on top of the escarpment I travelled to Mt Darragh where I captured this image.” – Harrison.

The Wild Eye Photo Competition has again highlighted the stunning diversity of the local environment and the talent of local photographers.

Coordinated by the Atlas of Life in the Coastal Wilderness, each entry gives the viewer a distinctive perspective on the other life forms we share this place with.

Twenty-two year old Bega Valley photographer Harrison Warne has again done well claiming the overall winner’s prize building on his success in previous years.

“I’ve had a lifelong passion for wildlife and from this began my love of photography,” Harrison says.

“Photography, for me, is about being able to tell a story and give emotion to a subject or image.

“Something that is very important to me is education – about environmental issues and conservation.

“By creating an interesting photo it causes interest in the subject which helps push an educational message.

Photography is about determination, patients, waking up way too early, getting lost in the middle of nowhere and taking risks, to achieve the ‘perfect’ shot.”

The competition takes in five main categories – Birds, Terrestrial Vertebrates, Marine & Intertidal, Plants & Fungi, and Invertebrates, as well as making space to encourage teenage photographers.

Winners are on exhibition during the school holidays at EyeQ, on Market Street, Merimbula, ahead of touring Bega Valley libraries. All the winning shots can also be viewed online via the Atlas of Life in the Coastal Wilderness.

Some of Region Media’s favourites:

First in Marine & Intertidal and First in Ecological Interactions. "Seal on bait ball" by Georgia Poyner. Location Narooma.

First in Marine & Intertidal and First in Ecological Interactions. “Seal on bait ball” by Georgia Poyner. Location Narooma.

First in 13-17 years, "Lace Monitor Claws" by Tess Poyner, Location: Mummaga Lake, Dalmeny. "I photographed this large Lace Monitor while kayaking. I was fascinated with how long his claws were for climbing!" - Tess.

First in 13-17 years, “Lace Monitor Claws” by Tess Poyner, Location: Mummaga Lake, Dalmeny. “I photographed this large Lace Monitor while kayaking. I was fascinated with how long his claws were for climbing!” – Tess.

First in Invertebrates and third place overall, "Death Mosaic" by Harrison Warne. Location: Bega. "On the arrival of spring rain, tens of thousands of termites leave the nest in search of a new place to set up. The unfortunate reality is most will die long before finding such a place." - Harrison.

First in Invertebrates and third place overall, “Death Mosaic” by Harrison Warne. Location: Bega. “On the arrival of spring rain, tens of thousands of termites leave the nest in search of a new place to set up. The unfortunate reality is most will die long before finding such a place.” – Harrison.

Third in Birds. "Three Willies" by Toni Ward. Location: Kameruka "These three little Willie Wagtails left their nest the next day. All three are still thriving." - Toni.

Third in Birds. “Three Willies” by Toni Ward. Location: Kameruka. “These three little Willie Wagtails left their nest the next day. All three are still thriving.” – Toni.

Second in Plants & Fungi, "Salt Marsh Veins" by Teena Burnell, Location: Panboola. "Like veins of mother nature winding through the salt marsh." - Teena.

Second in Plants & Fungi, “Salt Marsh Veins” by Teena Burnell, Location: Panboola. “Like veins of mother nature winding through the salt marsh.” – Teena.

Special mention to "Shallow Visitor" by Suzanne Hopkins, Location: Bega River. "Intrigued by this marine creature found in the shallows at the Bega River. So many different tones and unusual markings which made it a very fascinating specimen on exploration of the local area." - Suzanne.

Special mention to “Shallow Visitor” by Suzanne Hopkins, Location: Bega River. “Intrigued by this marine creature found in the shallows at the Bega River. So many different tones and unusual markings which made it a very fascinating specimen on exploration of the local area.” – Suzanne.

To take part in Atlas of Life citizen science activities including the Sea Slug Survey underway until January 20, check their website or subscribe to their regular newsletter.

What's Your Opinion?

Top