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Born on Anzac Day, Poppy delights keepers at Mogo Wildlife Park

Sharon Kelley29 April 2020
A mother zebra and her foal eating pasture at Mogo Wildlife Park.

Born on Anzac Day, Poppy the zebra foal – here with mum Mabulo – is named after the poppies of remembrance. Photo: Supplied.

On Saturday 25 April, 2020, a special little striped bundle of joy came into the world at Mogo Wildlife Park. She was christened Poppy by her keepers, after the poppies that signify WWI remembrance.

In a post on the Wildlife Park’s Facebook page, zookeeper Chad Staples said: “Such exciting news, we were greeted with the arrival of a perfect little zebra foal this morning. To honour the significance of Anzac Day we are naming the foal Poppy to always help us remember. Lest We Forget.”

Both Poppy and Mabulo, the foal’s mother, are doing well.

Such exciting news, we were greeted with the arrival of a perfect little zebra foal this morning.To honour the significance of ANZAC day we are naming the foal “poppy” to always help us remember LEST WE FORGET#anzacday #blessings #mogowildlifepark #visitnsw #australia #zooborns #zebra

Posted by Zookeeper Chad on Saturday, 25 April 2020

Chad was responsible for coordinating a bushfire response to protect the wildlife park during the past summer’s fires on the South Coast. He was responsible for sheltering many of the park’s animals at his home, including monkeys and red pandas.

Not one of the Mogo Wildlife Park’s 200 animals were injured in the fires, thanks to the 15 zookeepers under Chad’s direction, as well as having a detailed disaster plan.

Chad said conditions were “apocalyptic” as his team battled to protect dozens of breeds they consider “like family”, including an eight-day-old lion cub, later christened Phoenix.

Mogo Wildlife Park was required to temporarily close on Wednesday 25 March, 2020, to prevent the transmission of COVID-19 as per government mandates around social distancing.

The Park is currently constructing a new on-site veterinary hospital to help rehabilitate native wildlife in the area, particularly animals affected by the bushfires.

A GoFundMe page is available for anyone who wishes to support this specific rehabilitation project. For more information, visit the Mogo Zoo Fire Recovery page.

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