Eurobodalla and Bega Valley locals say “Stop Adani”

Eurobodalla locals gather on Congo Beach near Moruya. Photo: supplied
Eurobodalla locals gather on Congo Beach near Moruya. Photo: supplied

South East locals have been part of national protest action against the Adani coal mine proposed for North Queensland.

Protesters turned out in forty-five locations from Adelaide to Bondi to Bunbury over the weekend.

Locally, Eurobodalla 350 estimates around 250 people attended their protest at Congo Beach on Saturday, holding placards to spell out #STOP ADANI.

“We demand the federal government halt Adani’s enormous proposed coal mine,” spokesperson Allan Rees says.

In Bega, a colourful group marched through town on Friday and gathered in Littleton Gardens.

Organiser Sue Andrew sees the Adani mine as a litmus paper issue for a globe preparing for a climate change future.

“I feel now more than ever we have to unite to stand up against the fossil fuel industries and other extractive industries if we are serious about addressing climate change,” Ms Andrew says.

The Indian based Adani is seeking a billion dollar government loan to build a railway line linking its proposed Carmichael coal mine in the Galilee Basin to the Abbot Point coal port on the Great Barrier Reef.

Once complete, Carmichael would be Australia’s largest coal mine, with six open-cut pits and up to five underground mines, with a lifespan of between 25 and 60 years.

Queensland Labor Premier Annastacia Palaszczuk told the ABC the project will bring new jobs to communities like Rockhampton, Towsnville, Charters Towers, Mackay, and Claremont.

“You only have to travel to regional Queensland to understand what this project means to thousands of families out there that will be employed through this project,” she told the ABC

The Queensland Premier is also confident environmental concerns have been heard.

“At the end of the day we have the toughest environmental conditions attached to that mine,” she said.

Allan Rees says those that gathered at Congo on Saturday are angry that taxpayer dollars might be used to subsidise something “so destructive”.

“Adani’s mine may be far away, but the Eurobodalla can’t escape the climate change caused by burning that coal,” Mr Rees says.

“Australia has enormous reserves of coal which we must keep in the ground if we are to halt climate change.

“Climate change is here and is harming our agriculture and fishing.

“Beekeepers tell us how gum trees are blossoming at the wrong time, orchardists have lost trees from extreme heat, graziers and fishing people tell us how the climate is changing and harming their livelihoods,” Mr Rees says.

Bega locals march thorugh town with their marine puppets. Photo: Ian Campbell
Bega locals march through town with their marine puppets. Photo: Ian Campbell

Local fears also extend to the future of the Great Barrier Reef itself if the mine goes ahead with Bega protesters carrying a series of handmade marine creatures along Carp Street and into the town’s civic space.

“We know the Great Barrier Reef is highly endangered already and any further development or shipping would only increase the destruction of this incredible ecosystem,” Sue Andrew believes.

The exact number of jobs the $22 billion Adani investment will create is disputed, Adani claims 10,000 however the Land Court of Queensland has put the number at closer to 2,600.

That same court deemed the development could go ahead but added a number of new environmental safeguards.

While accepting new jobs are important for regional communities Allan Rees suggests the jobs created by the mine are floored and points to new jobs in greener industries.

“We have to support communities which currently rely on coal to have new industries to employ people,” he says.

“State and federal governments must develop programs to change to wind and solar, batteries and hydro, as well as energy efficiency.

“Australia has to give up coal mining and change to a renewable energy economy,” Mr Rees says.

“We should be retrofitting homes and businesses with insulation and using better designs for new buildings.”

Debate has been renewed on the back of a Four Corners investigation that aired last week on ABC TV.

“Adani has been exposed on the ABC’s Four Corners program as damaging people’s health, the livelihoods of farmers and fishing people and the environment in India,” Mr Rees says.

“Adani is using foreign tax havens and has a corporate structure that would allow them to minimise tax paid in Australia.

“The former Indian Environment Minister Jairam Ramesh said that it was almost beyond belief that the Australian Government would look to provide concessional loans and other taxpayer support to facilitate Adani Group’s coal mining project,” he says.

Prime Minister Malcolm Turnbull sees huge potential in the mine going forward – should it be built.

“It will generate, over the course of its life, an enormous amount in taxes and in royalties, revenues for state and federal ­governments,” he told The Australian back in April.

Adani has suggested it will break ground on the mine site before the end of this month with the first coal produced in early 2020.

The billion dollar loan from the Federal Government’s National Australia Infrastructure Facility (NAIF) remains undetermined.

However, News Limited has reported comments by Adani chairman Gautam Adani saying, “The project will be funded by internal accruals, NAIF and foreign banks.”

Bega’s Sue Andrew is positive people power will prevail.

“There is so much opposition. It is not viable; economically, ethically, or environmentally,” she says.

It is really a no-brainer, why not spend the proposed billion dollars from NAIF on building renewable energy infrastructure and thousands of sustainable jobs and show our commitment to our children’s future?”

Those behind the Eurobodalla and Bega Valley protests are committed to further action.

 

About Regional content is supported by the contributions of members. Thank you to Julie Klugman, Cathy Griff, Kate Liston-Mills, Shane O’Leary, Jenny Anderson, and Julie Rutherford Real Estate Bermagui.

Coasties farewell Tassie ahead of Karl Posselt Cup weekend

Back row - Craig Howker (Manager), Ruben Yee, Jacob Shields, Koby Cowen, Will Roberts, Gabriel Cross, Woti Fastigata, Toby Willington (Coach). Front row – Luke Shaw, Oscar Campbell, Taj Warren, Archer White, Jez Carrett, Isaac Willington, Zac Jolly, Liam Kelly.
Back row – Craig Howker (Manager), Ruben Yee, Jacob Shields, Koby Cowen, Will Roberts, Gabriel Cross, Woti Fastigata, Toby Willington (Coach). Front row – Luke Shaw, Oscar Campbell, Taj Warren, Archer White, Jez Carrett, Isaac Willington, Zac Jolly, Liam Kelly.

Months of training and fundraising have come together for fourteen lads from the Bega Valley and Eastern Victoria competing in the Launceston Soccer Tournament last weekend (Sept 22,23,24) in Tasmania.

The group of thirteen-year olds came from Bega, Merimbula, Eden, and Mallacoota, playing in the sky-blue jersey of the Far South Coast Soccer Association (FSCSA).

It’s been somewhat of a tradition for the local association who have sent an under 13’s rep side to the far-flung competition for over 20 years, however this year is the last for the time being.

Coach Toby Willington was pleased with his team’s efforts.

“It was great for the boys to come up against some tough competition, they learned lots that will benefit them and they handed out a few lessons of their own,” Toby said.

“They can be very proud to come away with two wins from four starts.”

The ‘Coasties’ finished second in their pool and came up against the Hills Hawkes from Sydney in the playoff for third spot.

The Tassie rain and wind was coming in sideways at kick-off, with the Coasties first to score. An evenly contested match played out with the Sydneysiders two ahead early in the second half.

The Hawkes managed to hold off a spirited charge late in the game to down the Coasties 4 – 3.

“These boys love their soccer and have had a ball playing in such a big competition,” Toby said.

Toby who was part of the winning 2012 Under 13’s Coasties side in Tassie interrupted his HSC preparations at Bega High to coach the side.

The Launceston Tournament attracts teams from New South Wales, Victoria and across the Apple Isle.

“In our 27th year we’ve attracted a record number of entries, which augurs well for the future of our beloved sport,” Dale Rigby, President of the Northern Tasmanian Junior Soccer Association said.

The trip south was only made possible through the generosity of the local community who supported the team’s fundraising efforts.

“The boys want to thank everyone who bought a raffle ticket or made a donation, we couldn’t have done this without you,” Will Roberts, Coasties Captain said.

The connection many local families have with ‘The Tassie Trip’ was evident during the team’s fundraising, with mums, dads, nannas, and grandpas buying tickets in 2017 because in years gone past it had been their kids on the street selling raffle tickets or chocolates.

FSCSA Rep Convenor and Under 13’s Manager, Craig Howker said it has been a big decision not to go to Tassie in 2018.

“Interest in soccer across the Bega Valley is growing, and we want to support more girls and boys playing at that higher level,” Craig said.

“The fundraising will continue, but we’ll be investing that money in better equipment and training, and creating more opportunities for teams from under 12 to Seniors to represent our region.

“We have some great local talent, and the Association is keen to back these kids and see them succeed,” he said.

The Coasties, first to the ball against the Hills Hawkes from Sydney.
The Coasties, first to the ball against the Hills Hawkes from Sydney.

The Under 13’s Coasties will return home in time to complete in the Karl Posselt (KP) Cup at Merimbula’s Berrambool Oval this coming weekend (Sept 29, 30 & Oct 1).

Now in its ninth year, the KP Cup is geared towards under 12’s and under 13’s boys and girls, and usually attracts around 30 teams from NSW, Victoria, and Tasmania.

The tournament recognises the outstanding contribution of Karl Posselt to the development of youth soccer not only at the Merimbula Grasshoppers, but also with Football NSW.

“The KP Cup is a huge effort for the local soccer community, but so worthwhile, thank you to all those helping out this weekend,” Craig said.

Podcast 18 – a local perspective on feminism in the 21st century

Tas Fitzer, Annie Werner, Jodie Stewart, Lorna Findlay, and Indigo Walker. Photo: Ian Campbell
Tas Fitzer, Annie Werner, Jodie Stewart, Lorna Findlay, and Indigo Walker, and the Mnemosyne mugs! Photo: Ian Campbell

In the depths of a Bega winter around 70 people turned out to the Bega Campus of the University of Wollongong to hear a local perspective on Feminism in the 21st Century.

Local writers group Mnemosyne posed the question – ‘Is feminism still relevant?’

A lively discussion followed.

Your host will introduce you to the panel and the meaning of Mnemosyne.

Mnemosyne: South Coast Women's Journal
Mnemosyne: South Coast Women’s Journal

The discussion doubled as the launch of a new local journal. The Kickstarter fundraising campaign runs until the end of September hoping to turn the journal into a reality.

You are about to find out more.

Your host is Ph.D. student, Jodie Stewart who has just been awarded the Deen De Bortoli Award for Applied History from the History Council of NSW for her work and research around the Bundian Way, and ancient Aboriginal pathway linking the Far South Coast and the Snowy Mountains of NSW.

Listen now via AudioBoom, bitesz, or Apple Podcasts/iTunes

Thanks to About Regional members, Tania Ward, Ingrid Mitchell, Deb Nave, and Scott Halfpenny for their support in making this podcast.

Cheers

Ian

A look at what’s to come – the Tathra to Bega Community Bike Ride

The Bega Tathra Safe Ride Track is no longer ‘somewhere over the rainbow’ but becoming a reality. Photo: Doug Reckord
The Bega Tathra Safe Ride Track is no longer ‘somewhere over the rainbow’ but becoming a reality. Photo: Doug Reckord

A Community Bike Ride from Tathra to Bega later this month will showcase the vision and potential of the ambitious plan to build a permanent track between the two towns.

Over $3 million in State Government funding earlier this year has turned the idea into a reality.

“We’ve been talking about this for a long time so to secure this funding was a dream come true, but we need to keep fundraising,” says Robert Hartemink, ‘Lead Rider’ of the Bega Tathra Safe Ride Committee.

On Sunday, September 24, rolling road closures starting at 9am from Lawrence Park Tathra will give riders a chance to experience the journey without the normal pressure of traffic – and the perfect way to wrap up NSW Bike Week.

“This will be a great family day, only the brave and keenest of riders can tackle this course normally, the speed and the closeness of cars and trucks is just too much for most,” Mr Hartemink says.

“I can’t wait to see families enjoying our beautiful countryside without that stress, not only on September 24 but whenever they choose to ride once we complete the track.”

Planning and design work for the new track is in full swing led by Bega Valley Shire Council.

“Council are keen to get as much bang for buck as possible, we are hoping to get as far as we can with the $3 million,” Mr Hartemink says.

“In the meantime we’ll push on with fundraising chipping away at each kilometre until it’s done.”

Entry fees for the ride are part of that effort but Bega Valley Legacy will share in the funds to support their work with families affected by war.

“When we finished this track it will be such a community asset – fitness, fun, sustainability, tourism, and we’ll get a taste of that on the twenty-fourth,” Mr Hartemink says.

The Community Bike Ride on September 24 will allow people to ride 'stress free'. Photo: Doug Reckord
The Community Bike Ride on September 24 will allow people to ride ‘stress free’. Photo: Doug Reckord

Entries are now open and the number of riders is starting to build as word spreads.

“For those who haven’t taken part in a mass ride before this will be a real thrill, there will be a real community spirit, everyone will be looked after,” he says.

The Tathra Sea Eagles AFL Club are preparing a hot breakfast and espresso coffee for riders from 7:30am, and the money will go towards the Clean Energy for Eternity solar panel project at Lawrence Park.

The finish line is the Bega Showground, with riders expected to arrive before 11am.

A bus donated by the Tathra Beach Country Club will get you back to your car at the start line.

Bega Tathra Safe Ride Secretary Doug Reckord adds, “This is a new event for the region and I really hope people are bitten by the riding bug and get a group together and register quickly.”

Tathra Beach and Bike have chipped in with a $500 voucher for the purchase of a ‘Specialized’ bike from their store. All riders will be in the draw for that fantastic prize.

There’s more information on the Bega Tathra Safe Ride Facebook page including a link to TryBooking.com for registrations.

“We are hoping the first section of track will be done in the first half of next year, and to keep the momentum going it would be terrific to see a big community turn out on September 24,” Mr Reckord says.

#Sponsored Post

 

Podcast 17 – Gabrielle Powell and the People of the Sun

Gabrielle Powell is one of those familiar faces around Bega, but she has just had an experience that took her way beyond her Pedan Street base.

For almost 11 years Gabrielle has been the manager of the town’s Women’s Resource Centre.

With long service leave in her sails, Gabrielle took off for Malawi in South East Africa, a country of 18 million people bordered by Zambia, Tanzania, and Mozambique.

There are no banana lounges or pina coladas with this getaway, Gabrielle was there for two months as a mentor to an artist’s co-operative.

A basket maker herself, Gabrielle had to put her art on the back seat, it was her management, admin, and leadership skills that were put to work with ‘People of the Sun’.

I got talking to Gabrielle about this experience of a lifetime just a few days after she returned…

or listen and subscribe via Audioboom, bitesz.com, or Apple Podcasts/iTunes.

Thank you to the About Regional members that made this podcast possible – investing in local stories.

People like Julie Rutherford Real Estate at Bermagui, the Bega Valley Regional Learning Centre at Merimbula, Deborah Dixon, Robyn Amair, and Patrick Reubinson.

Photos used in the slideshow from Gabrielle Powell and People of the Sun.

Thanks for listening.
Ian

Festival of Daring Possibilities asks – What if? Big picture thinking in Bega.

Cayce Hill
Cayce Hill

The ‘Festival of Daring Possibilities’ at the Funhouse in Bega has asked people to think big and solicited ideas that lead to new solutions and attitudes.

In stimulating the discussion, Funhouse founder, Cayce Hill said, “It’s the people not like us that make us grow.”

Cayce urging her audience of 30 people or more to inspire each other with their differences and unique perspectives.

“We’ve stopped telling the story of who we are and why, our identity gets weaker,” Cayce said.

The Festival was held as part of first birthday celebrations for the Funhouse, which over the last 12 months has become a hub for a range of artistic, sporting, social, and youth interests.

This old video shop come ‘community centre’ is itself a result of the big picture thinking the ‘Festival of Daring Possibilities’ looks to encourage.

“I started this place looking for a community, creating a space where not only I felt comfortable but also a place that welcomes and values strangers,” Cayce said.

Bega Valley Shire Councillor, Jo Dodds was also one of those planting seeds in the discussion.

“I love that random encounter and the challenge of finding common ground,” she said.

“We need to help the people in our community who are scared or afraid of difference.”

Offering an indigenous insight was Djiringanj and Ngarigo women, Tamika Townsend, who grew up in the Bega Valley but now works in Canberra across Aboriginal employment initiatives and more broadly – reconciliation.

“What if we could just start again?” Tamika pondered.

“What if the Djiringanj culture was more visible in this community?”

Tamika Townsend
Tamika Townsend

With family adding weight to Tamika’s message, Aunty Colleen Dixon spoke with strength to a captivated room about her experience growing up in Bega.

She spoke of not feeling welcome in town and an ever present racist attitude across every aspect of life.

“I was the eldest, and I remember walking along the river at Jellet one night with my brothers and sisters and bullets flying over our head, I just told them to get down,” Aunty Colleen said.

“There is a lot of trauma in this community,” Tamika said.

“Our history is very recent, there are people still traumatised.”

When asked to answer the question – What if? Aunty Colleen responded, “What if we had a cultural centre?”

The Djiringanj Elder suggesting such a space would bring all cultures together and create opportunities for connection and understanding, and build pride and purpose in her people.

Two more nights of discussion will roll out as part of the Festival of Daring Possibilities at the Funhouse – August 18 and September 15.

With a dinner of curry and spices infused in the air last Saturday night, festival goers were asked to add ideas to a wall of what if’s?

Click on each photo for a bigger view, and feel free to add your own ‘What if?’ in the comments box below…

Thanks to About Regional members Phil Martin, Gabrielle Powell, and Deborah Dixon for empowering local stories.

 

 

 

 

Feminism forum looks for local relevance and perspective

Join the forum on July 26, everyone is welcome
Join the forum on July 26, everyone is welcome

An open forum later this month is looking to find a local perspective and relevance around ‘Feminism in the 21st Century’.

It’s a topic that I instinctively pull away from but strangely am drawn to at the same time.

The women who lead these discussions continue to throw up modern experiences I struggle to identify with but none the less are experiences that I accept and am keen to understand.

This inaugural forum has been organised by the Bega Valley based ‘Mnemosyne: South Coast Women’s Journal

“At Mnemosyne, we have had many discussions about the term – feminism,” organiser Jodie Stewart explains.

“We have all had difficulties defining who we are in relation to a movement that has produced so many definitions of womanhood. We continue to search, to probe and to speculate.”

Perhaps I am not alone in the push and pull of Feminism?

Mnemosyne was the Greek goddess of memory and mother of the Muses, who were the goddesses of inspiration in literature, science and the arts. The story of Mnemosyne and her Muses centres on the skill and storytelling of oral cultures and the power of memory.

Locally a group of woman has taken inspiration from the Greek goddess and used her name to form a writing and discussion group, known as the ‘Mnemosyne: South Coast Women’s Journal

Those behind Mnemosyne the group/journal describe themselves as, “A feminist collective made up of PhD candidates, undergraduate students, creative writers, poets, musicians, filmmakers, historians, and librarians.”

Jodie Stewart. Source: Facebook
Jodie Stewart. Source: Facebook

“Our aim is to help raise the voices of women on the South Coast of New South Wales and to amplify them through the publication of the Mnemosyne: South Coast Women’s Journal,” the group’s website says.

To date, their writings have lived in the digital world, but the group is working towards a print edition of their ‘muses’.

Member, Noe Lumby says, “Our journal will reveal the stories, opinions, research and creative work of all south coast women.”

For any men still reading this, you are invited and welcome to Mnemosyne’s July 26 forum in Bega.

Mnemosyne hopes to foster a chorus of voices and men’s voices are an important part of this discussion,” Ms Stewart says.

“We have invited a young local man to be a part of our panel, Tas Fitzer, who stood as a candidate in last year’s local government elections.

“A range of experiences and insights are an important part of an open forum on contemporary feminism. All are welcome and we encourage everyone to come along,” Ms Stewart says.

Other panelists include Dr Annie Werner, Indigo Walker, and Lorna Findlay, with the discussion chaired by Ms Stewart, who is a PhD candidate and tutor at the University of Wollongong (UOW), Bega.

Dr Annie Werner is head tutor in the Faculty of Arts at the Bega campus of UOW. Her current research addresses the sexual and social challenges of living in a non-reconstructed post-breast-cancer body.

Indigo Walker is the founder of local business Topsy-turvy Intimates which makes underwear out of recycled materials. Indigo also represents the new generation of feminists and women’s social justice advocates.

Lorna Findlay is a feminist historian who studied law in Melbourne in the 1980s and then worked in the field of domestic violence.

Lorna’s research interest lies in the development of second and third wave feminism. She hopes to investigate the similarities and shared beliefs that remain and whether feminism has lost its political voice.

In speaking to About Regional, the forum’s chair is expecting some interesting discussion influenced by the forum’s rural setting.

“Like the rest of the country, there is still much work to be done here in South East NSW,” Ms Stewart says.

“At a practical level we need more women in leadership positions in our community and more women making decisions that affect other women.

“Only 7% of general managers and CEO’s in our area are women. According to the Bega Valley Shire’s ‘Social Issues Paper’.

“Women are also under-represented in higher paying jobs and over-represented in underpaying jobs,” she says.

“This has a significant impact on social justice outcomes for women in our community.”

The panel ready to talk feminism.
The panel ready to talk feminism on July 26 at UOW Bega.

While acknowledging the influence a female Mayor and a female General Manager of Council will have in the Bega Valley, Ms Stewart believes challenges still exist.

“It’s an important step forward and an important part of social and cultural change, but there remains a significant barrier in terms of social attitudes and pervasive gendered expectations,” Ms Stewart explains.

“Women are still funneled disproportionally into ‘caring roles’ both inside and outside of the workforce because these roles are still seen as inherently female,” she says.

Sexism and the equality issues that forged the feminist movement decades ago are still relevant now in the Bega Valley according to Ms Stewart.

“Sexism is the elephant in the room,” she believes.

“Sexism is institutionalised and is part of the everyday experience of being a woman, compounded when you are Indigenous, a woman of colour, if you are part of the LGBTQI community or a woman with a disability.

“In our community, it is still advantageous to be a white male,” Ms Stewart.

There is much of what Jodie Stewart talks about that I don’t understand or can relate to, I am one of those white males after all which no doubt blinds my judgment.

There is clear evidence though from those walking in different shoes that something needs to change, which gets my attention and opens my mind.

The ‘Feminism in the 21st Century’ Forum is on Wednesday, July 26 at the University of Wollongong, Bega from 5pm-7pm – a local opportunity to be part of a bigger discussion that is being led at a national and international level by writers and commentators like Clementine Ford and Jane Caro.

Mnemosyne: South Coast Women's Journal
Mnemosyne: South Coast Women’s Journal

Light refreshments will be provided and entry is by gold coin donation, all funds raised will go towards the publication of Mnemosyne’s first hardcopy edition.

RSVP to southcoastwomen1@gmail.com by Monday 24 July or book your free tickets online at www.mnemosynejournal.org/events

Disclaimer: About Regional is Media Partner for the ‘Feminism in the 21st Century’ Forum.

About Regional will be recording the forum for later publication.

Over $5 million for local cycleways including Bega to Tathra link

The long-awaited Bega to Tathra cycleway is set to become a reality with $3 million set aside in the NSW Budget this week.

Member for Bega, Andrew Constance said, “I am so excited to confirm the funds to build this important project.”

“This will not only better connect two of our great communities it will also provide a fantastic tourism driver and give the region a further economic boost.”

The money will go to Bega Valley Shire Council to work with the community and stakeholders to design, plan and construct the much-anticipated path.

The Bega – Tathra money was the largest part of a big splash of cash for local cycleways.

Other money announced by NSW Treasurer, Dominic Perrottet included:

  • $2 million for a shared pathway from Rotary Park in Merimbula to Merimbula Wharf.
  • Construction of 660 metres of shared path in Moruya along Bergalia Street.
  • Construction of almost 500 metres of shared path in Narooma along the northern end of McMillan Road.

The champagne corks were popping as Doug Reckord, the Secretary of the Bega Tathra Safe Ride Committee shared the news with his dedicated group. Click play for more.

Disclaimer: Author is part-time media officers for Bega Valley Shire Council

Daniel Champagne goes back to school ahead of his tour of South East NSW and the ACT

Class five at Mumbulla School in Bega played host to a star from their alumni today (June 14, 2017) ahead of a big gig at the school on Saturday night.

Over the next week, Daniel Champagne will also play in Braidwood, Jindabyne, Nowra, Canberra, and Sydney, check his website for ticket info.

Thanks for tuning in, the craft of video editing is new, baby steps! Stay tuned for part two, the kids get to ask the questions!

You might also be interested in catching up on the last time About Regional chatted with Daniel.

Cheers
Ian

About Regional presents TEDx Sydney in Bega – get your tickets here!

TEDx Sydney 2016. Source: TEDx Sydney
TEDx Sydney 2016. Source: TEDx Sydney

TEDx Sydney is the leading platform for promoting Australian ideas, creativity, and innovation to the rest of the world, and this year Bega gets a front row seat.

TED is a not for profit organisation devoted to ‘Ideas Worth Spreading’, you might be familiar with TED Talks – a global video and podcast sensation. These talks of between 5 and 20 minutes spark deep discussion and connection, TEDx Sydney is an extension of that.

People expert in their field, people you might not have never heard of stand up with something to say and usually stand up ‘for’ something.

On Friday, June 16, the Bega Valley Commemorative Civic Centre (BVCCC) will plug into the exclusive live video stream from TEDx Sydney at the International Convention Centre at Darling Harbour.

About Regional will host local discussion around the program from Sydney.

“Full of brilliant ideas and extraordinary stories that bring heart and mind together.” – TEDx Sydney 2016 attendee

The program is packed with people and ideas that will be new, people and ideas that will build on your own thoughts, and people and ideas that will challenge your way of thinking.

The live stream program on the big screen at the BVCCC is non-stop from 9am on Friday, June 16:

9:00am – 10:30am

  • Airling, fast becoming one of the most talked about young artists in Australia.
  • Bronwyn King, Australian radiation oncologist.
  • Tom Griffiths, Professor of Psychology and Cognitive Science at Berkeley University.
  • Judy Atkinson, community worker and academic in the fields of violence, trauma, and healing.
  • L-FRESH The LION, prowling the Australian scene, the Western Sydney artist has quickly become renowned for his powerful presence, inspiring live shows and thought-provoking lyricism.
  • Jane Gilmore, a journalist with a strong focus on data journalism and feminism.

11:15am – 12:45pm

2:15pm – 3:45pm

  • Uncle Jack Charles, award-winning actor, Aboriginal elder and musician.
  • Sarah Blasko, acclaimed singer, songwriter, musician and producer.
  • Sarah Houbolt, Paralympic swimmer, and circus performer.
  • David Power, helping to end the threat of illegal fishing and overfishing to Pacific Island communities.
  • Andy Dexterity, a performance maker recognised for his unique brand of movement, which fuses dance, physical theatre and signed languages.

4:30pm – 6:15pm

  • Stu Hunter, multi award-winning Australian composer, producer, and pianist.
  • Fast Ideas.
  • Scott Griffiths, researcher of male body dissatisfaction and eating disorders.
  • Jordan Raskopoulos, comedian, actor, singer and co-creator of The Axis of Awesome.
  • Peter Greste, an award-winning foreign correspondent.
  • Ngaiire, one of Australia’s most unique and fearless musicians

Following the live stream from Sydney, a local discussion with a room of thinkers and leaders will give TEDx a Bega Valley spin, finishing up before 7:30pm.

There are lots of ticketing options

Option 1: The live stream from TEDx Sydney will run all day, come and go as you please. An all-day pass, including gourmet finger food and a drink for the evening session, is $30.

Business people, entrepreneurs, students – anyone! Is invited to work from the BVCCC all day on June 16 with wifi and desk space provided. A chance to ‘get the job done’ and network with like-minded locals, all while being able to take part in TEDx Sydney. An all-day work pass costs $30, which gives you access to the BVCCC co-working space from 9am, as well as entry to the evening session with nibbls and a complimentary drink from 4:30.

The BVCCC. Source: Hines Constructions
The BVCCC. Source: Hines Constructions

Option 2: The lunch session runs 11:30 – 2:30 and costs just $10. Taking some inspiration from this year’s TEDx Sydney theme of ‘Unconventional’ you are encouraged to bring your own unconventional lunch along to the BVCCC, find a spot with friends in front of the big screen upstairs and take in the experience.

Option 3: The after work/evening session runs 4:30 till 7:00ish, come and enjoy TEDx Sydney with gourmet finger food and a drink, tickets are $25.

Bring your Friday drinks to the BVCCC, the bar will be open!

High school and university students can have all day access for just $5, evening drinks and nibbles are extra.

Get your tickets HERE and be part of the discussion.