Cooma MotorFest shines bright on a HUGE weekend

My car sits in the driveway at home covered by dust day in day out, rain is the only thing that gets my Subaru sparkling. A couple of hours at Cooma MotorFest on Saturday (Nov 4) is not going to change that but it has left its mark.

Brilliant blue Monaro skies backed the hard work of the Cooma Car Club and other local service groups; it was a magic day, not just for rev heads but for anyone that appreciates hard work, style, colour, and nostalgia.

This bi-annual event raises money for local charities and draws around 3000 people to Cooma Showground, not to mention car, truck, and machinery clubs from Canberra, the Far South Coast, and southern Monaro.

MotorFest is one of the anchor events for Cooma’s biggest weekend of the year – a weekend that also incorporates The Australian National Busking Championships and The Snowy Ride for the Steven Walter Foundation.

Cooma has extra buzz about it on the first weekend in November.

Capturing the hundreds of cars, trucks, and machines lined up on Cooma’s lush exhibition space is impossible, you’ll have to make sure you come along next time and see it all for yourself.

A few of my favourites were the Monaro, the “32 CDAN” and a hot red Mustang – any memories here for you?

How great that men, women, and families hang on to and protect this social history.

Cooma MotorFest is so much more than a “show’n’shine”.

Hope you enjoy the pics, more to come.

It wouldn't be a car show in Cooma without a Monaro! This 1969 Holden Monaro GTS was a crowd pleaser. Photo: Ian Campbell
It wouldn’t be a car show on the Monaro without a Monaro! This 1969 Holden Monaro HT GTS was a crowd pleaser. The car and the region are pronounced differently however. Monaro is said to be the Aboriginal word for ‘high plateau’ or ‘high plain’ or ‘treeless plain’. Photo: Ian Campbell
The HT Monaro marked the phasing out of the 5.0-litre Chevrolet V8 that featured in earlier models, and the introduction of Holden's own locally made V8 engines. Photo: Ian Campbell
The HT Monaro marked the phasing out of the 5.0-litre Chevrolet V8 that featured in earlier models, and the introduction of Holden’s own locally made V8 engines. Photo: Ian Campbell
According to Monaro car enthusiast Greg Wapling, a member of Holden's desugn team named the Monaro. "Noel Bedford, was driving through Cooma on holiday when a sign on the council offices took his eye. "It said Monaro County Council, n western-type lettering that reminded him of 'Marlboro Country', and fitted with the cars American styling and image. The car and the region are pronounced differently however. Monaro' is said to be the Aboriginal word for 'high plateau' or 'high plain' or 'treeless plain'. Photo: Ian Campbell
According to Monaro car enthusiast Greg Wapling, it was a member of Holden’s design team named the Monaro. Noel Bedford, was driving through Cooma on holiday when a sign on the council offices took his eye. It said Monaro County Council, in western-type lettering that reminded him of ‘Marlboro Country’, and fitted with the cars American styling and image.  Photo: Ian Campbell
Greg Wapling writes, in 1969, the Holden Dealer Team Monaro's came first (Bond/Roberts) and third (West/Brock) in the Bathurst 500. Photo: Ian Campbell
Greg Wapling writes, that in 1969, the Holden Dealer Team’s Monaros came first (Bond/Roberts) and third (West/Brock) in the Bathurst 500. Photo: Ian Campbell

This 1932 Ford Tudor was the jewel in the crowd at Cooma Showground for MotorFest 2017. Photo: Ian Campbell
This 1932 Ford Tudor was the jewel in the crown at Cooma Showground for MotorFest 2017. Photo: Ian Campbell
Look but don't touch! A sunny day showed this one off beautifully.Photo: Ian Campbell
Look but don’t touch! A sunny day showed this one off beautifully. Photo: Ian Campbell
The workmanship inside and out is jaw dropping. Photo: Ian Campbell
The workmanship inside and out is jaw-dropping. Photo: Ian Campbell
When first released in 1932, prices ranged between $495U.S and $650U.S, these days - priceless. Photo: Ian Campbell
When first released in 1932, prices ranged between $495U.S and $650U.S, these days – priceless. Photo: Ian Campbell

Ford released it's Mustang concept car in 1963, it was released on to the market in 1964. The original shape, style, and attitude continues to inspire the Mustang of today. Photo: Ian Campbell.
Ford released its Mustang concept car in 1963, it was released on to the market in 1964. The original shape, style, and attitude continues to inspire the Mustang of today. Photo: Ian Campbell.
The care and attention to detail the owners of these cars display is mind blowing. Photo: Ian Campbell
The care and attention to detail the owners of these cars display is mind-blowing. Photo: Ian Campbell
Wouldn't you just love to!? Photo: Ian Campbell
Wouldn’t you just love to!? Photo: Ian Campbell
How do you do that? Make a car engine shine and sparkle? Photo: Ian Campbell
How do you do that? Make a car engine shine and sparkle? Photo: Ian Campbell

*About Regional content is supported by the contributions of members, thank you to – Kiah Wilderness Tours, Alexandra Mayers, Amanda Stroud, Olwen Morris, Deborah Dixon, and Maria Linkenbagh.

 

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *